Medicine & History Lecture Series

 

Do you have a healthy curiosity about all things medical? Would you like to become a little more ‘ill-literate’? If so, you’re warmly invited to come along to our highly popular Medicine and History Lecture Series. You’ll enjoy a great social occasion, and you can also take the opportunity to visit the fascinating museum galleries as well as the shop and café.

Every year from October to March, these lectures look at a wide range of factors that have influenced changes in medicine and health.  All speakers have been chosen for their lively and entertaining approach.

Suitable for those with little or no knowledge of the subject, each session includes two lectures given by different speakers, each with an opportunity for discussion. The sessions begin at 10am and finish by 12.30pm. 

Download the leaflet

Enrol for the whole series here or pick and choose from the individual sessions below.


 

    • Saturday 7th October


    10am-12.30pm

    200 Years and counting - a history of Parkinson's Disease
    Dr Stephen Butterworth, Leeds General Infirmary

    Charles Dickens, Doctors and Medical Mysteries
    Dr Catherine Samiei, York St John University

    Booking is essential and tickets are available to buy online here

    This is a fundraising event

    Dr Stephen Butterworth is a Consultant Neurologist at Leeds General Infirmary.  He began his training at medical school in Leicester, before moving to Nottingham University to complete his M.D. thesis at the Magnetic Resonance Centre. After completing specialist Neurology training in Leeds, he took up a Consultant Neurology post in Pinderfields where he ran the movement disorder service for 12 years, serving amongst others around 1000 Parkinson's patients. He returned to Leeds as a Consultant Neurologist with an interest in Movement Disorders to develop the services locally. Outside of Medicine he is a keen cyclist and gardener.

    Dr Catherine Samiei is a Senior Lecturer in Education at York St John University. She completed her PhD at the University of Aberdeen exploring how reading Charles Dickens's fiction alongside medical texts could suggest new or alternative ways of understanding key characters and events. Her professional career has involved working in a variety of different roles in Higher Education teaching on English Literature, Medical Ethics and Education courses. She has taught at the University of Aberdeen, Robert Gordon University, Leeds Metropolitan University and the University of Bahrain. Her current research interests include exploring how literary representations of education provide insights into current policies and practices.

     

    • Saturday 4th November


    10am-12.30pm

    A monstrous conception indeed: Mary Toft, the "rabbit-woman" of Godalming, 1726
    Dr Adrian Wilson, The University of Leeds

    The history of Caesarean Sections in the development of modern obstetric practice
    Professor James Walker, The University of Leeds

    Booking is essential and tickets are available to buy online here

    This is a fundraising event

    Dr Adrian Wilson is a social historian (D.Phil. Sussex) turned historian of medicine who came to Leeds in 1993. He has published two books on the history of childbirth (The Making of Man-Midwifery; Ritual and Conflict) and is now leading, with Tania McIntosh of the University of Brighton, an AHRC-funded project on "The Risks of Childbirth in Historical Perspective". He has also worked on the history of hospitals and the history of disease-concepts, and his current interests include historical epistemology and the history and theory of advertising.

    Professor Walker is the Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in the University of Leeds. He has a long interest in developments that have led to the saving of the mother's and baby's life in childbirth. He was chairman of the CMACE, the organisation that undertook the audit into maternal and baby deaths in the UK and in the 1990's he chaired the National Caesarean Section audit in England. He is a former Senior Vice President of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists with the remit for Global Maternal Health and he travelled extensively to assess and help improve maternity provision worldwide. He is now the National Prefessional Advisor for the Care Quality Commission that oversees the inspection of maternity services.

     

    • Saturday 2nd December


    10am-12.30pm

    Working with Conscience: Pacifism, the Friends' Ambulance Unit and the First World War
    Dr Rebecca Wynter, The University of Birmingham

    Eye tests and Stretcher Drills: Training the Royal Army Medical Corps during the First World War
    Dr Jessica Meyer, The University of Leeds

    Booking is essential and tickets are available to buy online here

    This is a fundraising event

    Dr Rebecca Wynter is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow on the four-year AHRC-funded project. 'Forged by Fire: Burns Injuries and Identity in Britain, c.1800-2000' in Social Studies in Medicine (University of Birmingham). She is also a Lecturer in Quaker History at the Centre for Postgraduate Quaker Studies (University of Birmigham and University of Lancaster). She is a historian of psychiatry, neurology, and the First World War-era medicine.  Her areas of research - from nineteenth century whistleblowers in mental healthcare, to the brain on the BBC - have two themes in common: medicine, ethics and conscience; and how medicine and science have been communicated and understood.

    Dr Jessica Meyer is Associate Professor in Modern British History at the University of Leeds. Her research interests lie at the intersection of the histories of gender, war and medicine. Her monograph Men of War: Masculinity and the First World War in Britain was published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2009. She has also published extensively on gender and war disability, popular culture and the war, and voluntary medical services during the war.  She is currently completing a monograph on the roles and experiences of the ranks of the Royal Army Medical Corps during the war, An Equal Burden: The Men of the Royal Army Medical Corps in the First World War, to be published by Oxford University Press. She leads the European Research Council-funded project, Men, Women and Care, examining the gendering of care provision for British ex-servicemen in receipt of disability pensions after the war.

    • Saturday 13th January


    10am-12.30pm

    Three Personalities: The establishment of Vasular Surgery
    Mr Patrick Kent, Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust


    Ilizarov - the best Meccano set in the World...Ever!
    Mr Simon Britten, Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust

    Booking is essential and tickets are available to buy online here

    This is a fundraising event

    Mr Simon Britten is a Consultant Trauma & Orthopaedic Surgeon and Honorary Senior Lectuer at Leeds Teaching Hospitals. He completed surgical training in Bath and Bristol, followed by fellowship training in the Ilizarov Method at the Ilizarov Scientific Centre in Kurgan, Siberia. He was formerly an officer in the Royal Army Medical Corps, and gained experience in trauma and disaster management while serving with the Brigade of Gurkhas at British Military Hospital, Dharan at the time of the Nepal Earthquake, August 1988. As a House Surgeon at RAF Wroughton he was involved in the surgical care of servicemen evacuated from the First Gulf War. His clinical practice includes the treatment of severe lower limb fractures and post-traumatic limb reconstruction including non-union, mal-union and deformity, limb length inequality, bone loss, bone infection and amputation. He was elected to the committee of the British Limb Reconstruction Society in 2016 and is President of the Leeds and District Medico-legal Society. He is currently studying for a Masters of Law (LLM) degree in Medical Law and Ethics at De Montford University Leicester. His other interests include Leeds Rhinos Rugby League Football Club, modern languages and Lady Gaga.
     

    • Saturday 3rd February


    10am-12.30pm          

    "So you want to work abroad?" Missionaries, mercenaries and misfits?
    Dr Andrew Lee, Public Health England

    History and development of the Coroner's System in England and Wales
    Professor Paul Marks, Senior Coroner for the County of the East Riding of Yorkshire and the City of Kingston upon Hull

    Booking is essential and tickets are available to buy online here

     

    This is a fundraising event

    Dr Andrew Lee initially trained as a paediatrician and in tropical medicine before embarking on a varied potpurri career working in international health. He is a self-professed disaster junkie who has worked in post-conflict Afghanistan, as well as various disaster zones such as Sri Lanka after the 2004 tsunami disaster, post-cholera Zimbabwe, and after typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. He currently works as a Consultant in Communicable Disease Control with Public Health England in Yorkshire. He is also a Senior Lecturer at the University of Sheffield where he teaches communicable disease control, disaster management, and global public health. At various points in his career he has probably been a missionary, mercenary and misfit in international health, and is keen for others not to repeat the same mistakes he has made in the past! 

    Professor Paul Marks trained in Neurosurgery in London and Cambridge and was appointed to his first consultant post at Aukland Hospital in New Zealand in 1990. He returned to England in 1992 and took up a post as Consultant Neurosurgeon with a specialist interest in cerebrovascular disease, pituitary surgery and spinal disorders at the Leeds General Infirmary until 2012. He read law at Cardiff Law School and has an interest in teaching law to medical practitioners and other healthcare professionals. In 2012 he was appointed as Senior Coroner for the County of the East Riding of Yorkshire and City of Kingston upon Hull and was the last medically qualified Coroner to be appointed to such a position.

     

    • Saturday 3rd March


    10am-12.30pm

    How technology improved how we hear - a timeline of progress
    Professor Christopher H Raine MBE, Bradford Royal Infirmary

    Carved Cadaver Memorials: A window into religion, sin, anatomy, death and medicine
    Dr Christina Welch, The University of Winchester

    Booking is essential and tickets are available to buy online here


    This is a fundraising event

    Professor Raine is a Consultant Otolaryngologist based at Bradford Royal Infirmary. Appointed in 1986, in addition to offering general ENT treatment his specialisation has been in developing paediatric and adult otology with focus on dealing with patients with severe to profound hearing loss. He established the supra-regional Yorkshire Cochlear Implant Service in 1989. He has been very active in clinical research and supporting other countries establish otological services - the most recent in Malawi.  In addition to his clinical work he teaches and examines both for the Intercollegiate final exams but also for the European Board exams. He is also advisor to NHS England and currently producing commissioning guidelines for various aspects of ear surgery.

    Dr Christina Welch lectures in Religious Studies, and Death Studies, at the University of Winchester in the Theology, Religion and Philosophy department. Her research interests combine her passion for material and visual culture with religion and death, and have a focus on late-medieval British (and Irish) carved cadaver memorials, and she is setting up a website on these sculptures www.britishcarvedcadavers.co.uk.   As part of this work, Christina is currently working collaboratively with an anatomic  sculptor and a forensic anatomist to explore the anatomical aspects of these unusual memorials.